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Welcome to the website for ‘Working Across Qualitative Longitudinal Studies: A Feasibility Study Looking at Care and Intimacy’.

Over the course of the next two years (until May 2018) we will be reflecting, debating and actively demonstrating the feasibility of conducting secondary analysis across existing data from several qualitative longitudinal studies. To do this, we will be using archived data from the ESRC Timescapes project and focusing on the substantive topic of care and intimacy. Through the study we hope to explore new procedures for working with multiple sets of qualitative longitudinal data and extend good practice in this emergent, and important, field of research.

The research is being conducted by Professor Rosalind Edwards and Dr Susie Weller from the University of Southampton and Dr Emma Davidson and Professor Lynn Jamieson from the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships. It is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council as part of a package of research by the National Centre for Research Methods.

In this website you can find more detailed information about the project, and also follow regular blogs by the team and guest contributors on our exploration into qualitative longitudinal data analysis and working with large qualitative and / or secondary data.

Don’t forgot to subscribe to the project. Add your email address in the subscribe box and you will receive a notification of all new posts. We would also like to know more about your work. If you have an idea, or a project you would like to share you can write for us.

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Guest post #7, Dr Gregor Wiedemann: Computer-assisted text analysis beyond words

Dr Gregor Wiedemann works in the Natural Language Processing Group at Leipzig University. He studied Political Science and Computer Science in Leipzig and Miami. In his research, he develops methods and workflows of text mining for applications in social sciences. In September 2016, he published the book “Text Mining for Qualitative Data Analysis in the Social …

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Guest post #6, Nick Emmel: Revisiting yesterday’s data today

Today we welcome Dr Nick Emmel as our guest blogger. Nick has been investigating social exclusion and vulnerability in low-income communities in a city in northern England since 1999. The research discussed in this blog, Intergenerational Exchange, was an investigation of the care grandparents provide for their children. This was a part of Timescapes, the …

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