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Welcome to the website for ‘Working Across Qualitative Longitudinal Studies: A Feasibility Study Looking at Care and Intimacy’.

Over the course of the next three years (until January 2019) we will be reflecting, debating and actively demonstrating the feasibility of conducting secondary analysis across existing data from several qualitative longitudinal studies. To do this, we will be using archived data from the ESRC Timescapes project and focusing on the substantive topic of care and intimacy. Through the study we hope to explore new procedures for working with multiple sets of qualitative longitudinal data and extend good practice in this emergent, and important, field of research.

The research is being conducted by Professor Rosalind Edwards and Dr Susie Weller from the University of Southampton and Dr Emma Davidson and Professor Lynn Jamieson from the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships. It is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council as part of a package of research by the National Centre for Research Methods.

In this website you can find more detailed information about the project, and also follow regular blogs by the team and guest contributors on our exploration into qualitative longitudinal data analysis and working with large qualitative and / or secondary data.

Don’t forgot to subscribe to the project. Add your email address in the subscribe box and you will receive a notification of all new posts. We would also like to know more about your work. If you have an idea, or a project you would like to share you can write for us.

Guest post #17 Dr Daniel Turner: Can a computer do qualitative analysis?

This guest blog post is by Dr Daniel Turner, a qualitative researcher and Director of Quirkos, a simple and visual software tool for qualitative analysis. It’s based on collaborative research with Claire Grover, Claire Lewellyn, and the late Jon Oberlander at the Informatics department, University of Edinburgh with Kathrin Cresswell and Aziz Sheikh from the …

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Guest Post#16: Prof Rachel Thomson, Dr Sara Bragg and Dr Liam Berriman: Time, technology and documentation

In today’s guest post Rachel Thomson, Sara Bragg and Liam Berriman (University of Sussex) encourage us to reconsider the idea of archiving data as the end point of a study. Drawing on material from their new book Researching Everyday Childhoods: Time, Technology and Documentation in a Digital Age they argue that technological transformations have opened …

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Guest Post #15: Dr Ruth Patrick: Analytic strategies for working within and across cases in qualitative longitudinal research

Dr Ruth Patrick, Social Policy Researcher in the School of Law and Social Justice, University of Liverpool, contributes today’s guest post. Ruth’s research illustrates the ways in which qualitative longitudinal research can help us to understand popular and political narratives around poverty, welfare reform and austerity and lived experiences for those directly affected by recent …

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Guest Post #14: Prof Jane Millar and Prof Tess Ridge: Following families

In today’s guest post Jane Millar and Tess Ridge, draw on some of the insights gleaned from their qualitative longitudinal study, The family work project: earning and caring in low-income households. The latest phase – following up 15 of the original families – was completed in early 2017, and published as Work and relationships over time …

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